>Tag:jump rope

Punk Rope at Allentown ArtsFest 9/27-9/29

Punk Rope is offering a free jump rope instructor certification and two free jump rope clinics at Allentown ArtsFest in Allentown, PA. These programs are made possible by the generosity of my late parents, Bob and Vicky Haft.​ Details are below.​

JUMP ROPE INSTRUCTOR CERTIFICATION
Saturday, Sept 28 • noon-6pm
Rain date: Sun, Sept 29 • 9am-3pm
Space is limited. RSVP to tim@punkrope.com is required.
You’ll learn all the skills necessary to teach anyone—from elite athlete to recovering couch potato—how to use rope jumping to improve their overall fitness and athleticism. After successfully completing the certification you’ll be qualified to launch your own jump rope class or program. Each participant will have their form evaluated via video analysis and will receive an instructor’s e-manual along with a custom-sized jump rope and wrist trainer and CECs from ACE (.7), AFAA (8), ISSA (7), and NASM (.8). Cost: Free (regularly $249).

JUMP ROPE CLINICS
Friday, Sept 27 • 5-7pm
Sunday, Sept 29 • noon-2pm
Learn how to use rope jumping to improve your coordination, agility, speed, balance, and more. We’ll cover a variety of steps including double unders, crosses, the alternating foot step, and many more. All ages and ability levels are welcome. RSVP appreciated but not required. Jump ropes provided.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS
Tim Haft created Punk Rope in 2004 and has been jumping rope since 1976. Tim is certified by ACE, USA Track & Field, TRX, ISCA, USAFIT, Resist-a-Ball, and Precision Nutrition. Shana Brady joined the Punk Rope team in 2005 as director of training. Shana holds a BS in Exercise Science and is certified by ACSM, NASM, ACE, and FMS. Haft and Brady have certified more than 1000 jump rope instructors worldwide and have presented jump rope seminars at more than 125 CrossFit gyms as well as at numerous public schools. Heather Wagner is a lifelong athlete and black belt in karate and is certified by ACE and Punk Rope.

ABOUT ARTSFEST
Allentown ArtsFest takes place at Cedar Beach Park in Allentown, PA on 9/27 (4-11pm), 9/28 (noon-11pm), and 9/29 (11am-8pm). There will be live music, activities for kids, a skate park, comedy shows, breakdancing competitions, artwork on display, and lots of local food, beer, and wine.

QUESTIONS
Contact tim at tim@punkrope.com or 646-263-9128

By | 2019-08-09T12:14:45-04:00 July 24th, 2019|0 Comments

How to warm up to jump rope

The warm-up is a key component of any intense workout and is especially important for jumping rope to make sure your body and mind are prepared for the more challenging work to follow.

In this video, Punk Rope director of training, Shana Brady, and Punk Roper, Seitu Allen, take you through a full jump rope warm-up, which includes joint rotations, dynamic stretches, and “shadow” jumping (jumping without the rope) to ensure that you elevate your heart rate and break a light sweat before launching your actual workout.

By | 2019-06-27T13:42:01-04:00 June 27th, 2019|0 Comments

What I Learned When My Students Began Jumping Rope

By Janet Beihoffer (04/11/2019)

By now the outcry has been heard and confirmed: Children need recess or other forms of physical activity to thrive in school.

But I could have told you that. As a veteran teacher, I stumbled on this fact in my own classroom quite by accident.

Years ago my students took the required, but now defunct, President’s Challenge physical fitness test. Most teachers left the requirement to the P.E. staff. One year, however, I was informed that most of my fifth grade students had failed the test.

I took that personally. I was an athlete at age 10. MY students would not flunk the physical education test. But what could I do?

Eventually I found an article about a school system which had its students jumping rope every day. “Why not try this?” I asked myself. So off to the hardware store I went to purchase about 120 feet of clothesline. Returning home, I cut 25 “jumping ropes,” one for each of my students.

From that point on, my students and I jumped rope one minute each day before returning to the classroom after the noon recess. We added another minute every week following until we reached five minutes.

Did it work?

The answer was a resounding yes when it came to the President’s Challenge. Every student passed it the following spring.

But something else happened that was even more impressive.

Through the jump roping regimen, one boy had an incredibly difficult time getting the rope over his head and jumping over it. His eyes were misaligned and I’m sure that influenced his lack of coordination. Nevertheless, he tried every day with the others.

This same boy was very bright, but had horrible penmanship. However, this began to improve over time.

One afternoon I called him to my desk to congratulate him on his handwriting. He responded by saying, “Well, the only reason I think this happened is because of jumping rope. I believe my brain has re-patterned itself.”

Could this kind of program be done today? Even though recess is rising in popularity, we have eliminated many other avenues for fitness, including less outside time, no Red Rover, and no Dodge Ball. Have we gone so far in protecting kids that we are cheating them of self-confidence, physical improvement, better motor skills, and maybe even better academic results?

Perhaps it’s time to get out the jump ropes.

By | 2019-04-18T13:29:08-04:00 April 18th, 2019|0 Comments

Prison, jump rope, and a new beginning

I’ve never been incarcerated, but I did work at the House of Detention for Men at Rikers Island as a Prison Legal Assistant from 1982 to 1983, immediately after graduating from college. It was the most challenging and eye-opening job I’ve ever held and it significantly altered my views about people behind bars. But this story is not about me or my beliefs. It’s about Missie (above left with Nero, a service dog who Missie helped to train). Missie has been incarcerated since 2010. She found us by way of her friend Lisa (above right with Missie) and is now a certified Punk Rope Instructor by virtue of completing our home study course and acing the multiple choice exam. I’m going to shut up now and let Missie do the talking. The following essay was written by Missie less than two weeks ago. We’ve reprinted it in its entirety. We wish her the best of luck.

I used to be a runner. I have no hard feelings toward running—the sport taught me about discipline and perseverance, friendship and community, joy and grief. It also introduced me to a feeling of freedom in a world where freedom is a word only whispered about.

I am currently incarcerated.

In 2010, I lost my worldly freedoms to incarceration. My life prior to prison looked good on the outside, but it wasn’t. I ended up making a terrible choice that placed me behind bars. At 30 years old, 255 pounds with poor physical health, I needed to make some changes. However, internally, I also needed repair and healing of the woman inside of me.

Running became a passion of mine, giving me a sense of internal freedom. As my physical body and physical health improved, I also gained the freedom to walk with self-confidence, self-reliance, and an unrelenting self-awareness. I gained the internal freedom to look at myself with unfaltering clarity, for better and for worse. And I began to heal.

As time passed behind bars, my passion for fitness expanded beyond running. I started taking yoga classes and I became interested in strength training. Ultimately in December of 2017 I became a certified fitness trainer through the International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA).

During my six months of testing my quest to expand my fitness pursuits and my journey towards internal freedom continued. And it continued with something I wasn’t very good at initially. I started to jump rope. The physical benefits (and challenges) of jump rope were apparent to me from the very beginning. The internal benefits have been shown to me along the way.

To push through the early (awkward) stages of jump rope, I practiced. And practiced. And practiced. And I still practice! It took some time to be comfortable, but eventually I began instructing a jump rope class at the institution.

I envisioned a jump rope class to be something different than the other classes offered at the institution. I wanted something challenging (!) and fun (!) and I wanted lots of sweating (!) and cheering (!) and laughing (!) and I wanted lots of joy (!) and dance music (!) and black lights (!). At 8am on Sundays I can say my jump rope class has it all but the black lights 🙂

Through instruction of this very-early-highly-energized-jump-rope class, I found the internal freedom to be whom I ultimately was created to be—a person who is humbly motivating, encouraging, and uplifting for others. A woman who quietly makes a difference, sometimes very small, but those small differences ripple outwards.

My journey with fitness over the past seven years has taught me that improving the quality of my life has subsequently improved the quality of others’ lives. And that the impact we make on others matters above anything else. Sure, the calorie burn of a workout and rope jumping interval times matter, but never above the joy and empowerment and degree of personal choice they bring. I have learned that fitness is a lifestyle and that freedom is a mindset and that both of these things are conscious choices, liberating choices, that move us forward from the things that hold us back.

By | 2018-04-30T22:28:43-04:00 April 30th, 2018|0 Comments

A gizmo that counts your jumps!

Counting successful jumps is one way to measure progress. Perhaps when you first started jumping rope, 50 jumps seemed liked an unattainable goal. But maybe now you’re aiming for 250 or 500 or even 1,000. Some people can keep a running tally in their head as they jump, but not me. I get distracted pretty easily and I don’t think I’m alone. And for some of those Crossrope challenges (some of you know exactly what I’m talking about) you practically need to be a math major to be able to compete. Well I have good news for you!

Our friend, Tori Boggs—who happens to be one of the best rope jumpers in the world—and a team of engineers, has invented an ingenious product called Tally Jump, that takes the guesswork out of counting your jumps.

The product is currently in development and a Kickstarter was recently launched to help Tori and her team raise the funds necessary to get Tally Jump to market. You can back the project and be one of the first kids on the block to have your very own Tally Jump. I just did to the tune of $74 which is roughly 25% off the retail price. Click below to become a backer:
http://kck.st/2K2yw9p

By | 2018-04-28T10:14:00-04:00 April 28th, 2018|0 Comments

Jump for Life

You might recall from a recent post that I was beyond psyched about my beloved Virginia Cavaliers who had just been granted the #1 overall seed in the NCAA Men’s D1 basketball tournament. And as you may know by now, Virginia became the first #1 seed in the history of the men’s tournament to lose to a #16 seed (UMBC) in the first round. Some sportswriters are calling it the greatest sports upset of all time. Even so, it was just a game without life or death consequences.

Since then, we bore witness to what I believe is one of the largest and most inspiring marches on our nation’s capital in history, along with hundreds of other impressive marches around the globe. The Washington DC march was organized largely by teenagers who survived the recent mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School. And arguably the most powerful speech in DC was delivered by Emma Gonzalez, an 18-year-old senior at Stoneman Douglas. Her speech—much of it without words—lasted 6 minutes and 20 seconds, exactly the amount of time it took Nikolas Cruz to massacre 14 of her classmates as well as 3 teachers and coaches.

In honor of those who lost their lives at Stoneman Douglas, as well as the countless victims of school shootings everywhere; in honor of Emma Gonzalez and the brave survivors who have risen above the cacophony of adult voices trying to silence them; and as a nod to choosing life over death, peace over violence, and love over hate this week’s Punk Rope Challenge is:

Jump for 6 minutes and 20 seconds non-stop.
Choose whichever step you like.
Choose multiple steps if you prefer.
Whatever you do, CHOOSE LIFE.

By | 2018-03-25T21:55:30-04:00 March 25th, 2018|0 Comments
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